Tag Archives: New York State Register of Historic Places

27 Nominations for State, National Historic Registers

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 27 properties and districts to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including the nationally significant home of abolitionist James C. Beecher, the world’s oldest pet cemetery, and a modern housing community planned by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Continue reading

31 Recommended for State, National Registers

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 31 properties and districts to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including a Lake Champlain shipwreck, a post-World War II auto dealership, and a 200-year-old Catskill inn that survived the catastrophic floods of Tropical Storm Irene.

Listing these properties on the State and National Registers can assist their owners in revitalizing the structures, making them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and state and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits.

The State and National Registers are the official lists of buildings, structures, districts, landscapes, objects and sites significant in the history, architecture, archeology and culture of New York State and the nation. There are 90,000 historic buildings, structures and sites throughout the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places, individually or as components of historic districts. Property owners, municipalities and organizations from communities throughout the state sponsored the nominations.

Once the recommendations are approved by the state historic preservation officer, the properties are listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places and then nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, where they are reviewed and, once approved, entered on the National Register.

STATE REVIEW BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS

Albany County

The Dr. Wesley Blaisdell home, Coeymans – the imposing 1838 Greek Revival-style home constructed by Dr. Wesley Blaisdell, physician and son of a wealthy landowner, remains a visual landmark in the local community and stands as a monument to several of the community’s leading citizens and families.

Cayuga County

Cottage Farm, Fair Haven – one of the oldest seasonal houses in the village of Fair Haven was originally built in the 1830s and extensively remodeled around 1880 and again in 1910, and is a reminder of the village’s long tradition of being a seasonal vacation destination on Lake Ontario.

Columbia County

The Bartlett House, Ghent &#8212- the former railroad hotel built in 1870 was at one time the centerpiece of a cluster of buildings, many of which have fallen away, that marked the intersection of the New York & Harlem Valley and Berkshire Railroads, providing a link to the post-Civil War growth of the hamlet.

Copake Falls Methodist Episcopal Church, Copake – dedicated in 1892, the highly intact example of ruralLate Victorian era ecclesiastical design was built on land donated to the group by the Miles family, which was associated with the nearby Copake Iron Works, and is now home of the Roeliff Jansen Historical Society.

The Daniel and Clarissa Baldwin House, Spencertown – built in1807, it is a distinctive example of Federalperiod domestic architecture reflecting the influence of New England construction methods brought west by the hamlet’s early settlers, who largely came from overpopulated regions of Connecticut.

Erie County

The American Grain Complex, Buffalo – the intact collection of early 19th century buildings embody the tale of Buffalo’s leading role in transshipment of grain from the Midwest to the East, and the handling of grain to produce malt for the brewing industry and flour for the baking industry.

The Automobile Club of Buffalo, Clarence – the 1910 Craftsman-style building housed the automobile club that not only brought together early automobile enthusiasts, but lobbied for pro-motorist legislation that was integral to the development of the automobile generally and of paved roads throughout New York State.

Buffalo Meter Company Building, Buffalo – the 1915 building is an excellent and largely intact example of a reinforced concrete frame daylight factory celebrated their structure and functionality with minimal ornament were highly influential to Modern Architecture.

Essex County

The Canal Boat Vergennes – a rare example of a class of mid-19th century Champlain canal boat that was archaeologically unknown until the shipwreck’s discovery in 1998, it is significant for the understanding it can provide for both the history of the Champlain Canal and the evolution of canal boat construction.

Greene County

John and Martinus Laraway Inn, Prattsville &#8212- a distinctive example of late Federal/early Greek Revival design, the inn was constructed ( in part) in the late 18th century to become one of the region’s most recognizable visual landmarks, hosted the town’s first organizational meeting in 1833, and survived catastrophic flooding in 2011.

Kings County

The Wallabout Industrial Historic District, Brooklyn –lined predominately with late-19th and early- to mid-20th-century industrial buildings, the district reflects the paramount importance of industry in Brooklyn as it developed into one of America’s major industrial centers.

Monroe County

Church of Saints Peter and Paul Complex, Rochester – built between 1911 and 1926, the excellent example of the Italian Renaissance Revival style was built by a parish organized to meet the needs of the growing Catholic German immigrant population in the city.

George J. Michelsen Furniture Factory, Rochester &#8212- built in 1914 for one of Rochester’s longest-running family concerns, the imposing industrial building was home to a company that survived the Depression, unlike many Rochester furniture makers, and continued to manufacture bedroom furniture at the site until the late 1950s.

William A. Payne House, Greece – the 1905 Queen Anne-style home was owned by William A. Payne, who made an impact on local and state commercial practices through his leadership in developing fair and uniform methods of weighing and measuring for merchants and consumers.

Niagara County

First Presbyterian Manse (also known as the Lavinia E. Porter House), Niagara Falls – Located on Buffalo Avenue, the Italianate-style home built before 1851 in one of the city’s oldest sections is one of two mid-19th century houses left in an area that consists mostly of 20th century hotels and commercial buildings.

Oneida County

Wright Settlement Cemetery, Rome – the cemetery records the lives of the families who settled the town after the Revolutionary War, which is especially important in light of the fact that physical links to the farming community were lost to the development of the Rome Air Depot in 1941.

Onondaga County

Scottholm Tract Historic District, Syracuse – largely developed between 1915 and 1940 at the transition between the streetcar and automobile, the subdivision represents the growth of single-family residential enclaves within the city, with curving boulevards featuring dense tree-cover, large lots, and a variety of architectural styles.

Orange County

Denniston, New Windsor – Built in 1875, the house is a rare and architecturally significant example of non-reinforced concrete construction in the mid-Hudson Valley.

Union Chapel, Cornwall-on-Hudson &#8212- built in 1873, it was erected by Cornwall’s Orthodox Quakers in the post-Civil War period to extend of religion to the residents of Cornwall Landing, and served as both a Quaker mission and Sunday school, at times non-denominational, before eventually falling into disuse.

Orleans County

The Clarendon Stone Store, Clarendon – Constructed in 1836 from locally quarried Medina sandstone, the rare surviving example of an early 19th century stone store played a central role in village life, also housing the post office, the town clerk’s office and the town court at different times.

Payjack Chevrolet Building, Medina – built in 1949 in accordance with modern design principles General Motors encouraged its dealers to adopt after World War II, the business known today as Hartway Chevrolet is one of the few remaining from Medina’s &#8220Automobile Row&#8221 at the edge of the village’s commercial center.

Rockland County

Brookside, Upper Nyack – built around 1865 and substantially enlarged and modified around 1890, the home is a noteworthy example of the large villas which were central features of estates developed in the Hudson River corridor by the affluent in the 19th century.

Seaman-Knapp House, Ladentown – erected sometime near the turn of the 19th century, the house reflects both Dutch and English vernacular building traditions and was at one point used as a place of assembly for religious purposes by the local Quaker community.

St. Lawrence County

Hepburn Library of Colton – the 1912 library, notable for its rustic stonework, was endowed by Colton native Alonzo Barton Hepburn, a successful lawyer, banker and state and federal government official, who donated an estimated $3 million for construction of libraries, schools and hospitals in St. Lawrence County and elsewhere.

Schoharie County

Stewart House and Howard-Stewart Family Cemetery, South Jefferson – the 1850s home is a high intact example of a Greek Revival farmhouse and the cemetery reflects rural 19th century burial practices when family members were buried on their own properties.

Suffolk County

Riverhead Main Street Historic District, Riverhead – strategically located on the Peconic River and at the split of Long Island’s North and South Forks, the concentration of buildings represents Riverhead’s importance as the center of business, culture, entertainment and government on the East End of Long Island.

Ulster County

Ellenville Historic District, Ellenville &#8212- the historic district illustrates how forces from the development of the Delaware and Hudson Canal in the early 19th century to the role of the &#8220Borscht Belt&#8221 era summer resort economy following the Second World War shaped the commercial core of the crossroads village.

Pine Hill Historic District, Pine Hill – the cohesive collection of late 19th century and early 20th century buildings represent the heyday of summer tourism in the Catskill Mountains.

Westchester County

Dale Cemetery, Ossining – incorporated in 1852 and laid out in the rural cemetery tradition, with winding paths set along forested gentle hillsides, the cemetery retains much of its mid-19th century plan and is the final resting place of many of Westchester County’s prominent citizens.

Downtown Ossining Historic District (Boundary Expansion) – the boundary expansion includes four contributing buildings that were not included in the 1988 nomination, but which are characteristic of the historic district’s 1840 to 1933 period of significance.

Wyoming County

First Free Will Baptist Church, Pike – the 1881 structure is a representative example of a late 19th century Gothic Revival-style church and the last surviving historic religious building in the small rural community.

Photo: Grain elevators and canal boats in Buffalo Harbor.

39 Sites Recommended for State, National Registers

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 39 properties to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including the nation’s first fish hatchery, the neighborhood that grew up near the Brooklyn Naval Yard, and a roadside souvenir stand modeled after a tepee.

Listing these properties on the State and National Registers can assist their owners in revitalizing the structures, making them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and state and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits.


The State and National Registers are the official lists of buildings, structures, districts, landscapes, objects and sites significant in the history, architecture, archeology and culture of New York State and the nation. There are 90,000 historic buildings, structures and sites throughout the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places, individually or as components of historic districts. Property owners, municipalities and organizations from communities throughout the state sponsored the nominations.

Once the recommendations are approved by the state historic preservation officer, the properties are listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places and then nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, where they are reviewed and, once approved, entered on the National Register.

STATE REVIEW BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS

Albany County

Potter Hollow District #19 School, Potter Hollow – constructed in 1853 in response to the educational reform movements of the mid-nineteenth century, the rural vernacular one-room schoolhouse retains an exceptionally high degree of architectural integrity.

University Club, Albany – the front portion of the Colonial Revival structure, designed by prominent Albany architect Robert Fuller, was built in 1924-25 for the club established earlier in the century to &#8220promote social discourse among its members and to cultivate and maintain university spirit in Albany.&#8221

Bronx County

Dollar Savings Bank, Bronx – today the Bronx Temple Seventh Day Adventist Church, the 1919 bank is a distinguished example of Classical Revival design that reflects the commercial history of one of the most important banking institutions in the Bronx.

Broome County

Harlow E. Bundy House, Binghamton – the Queen Anne-style home was built in 1893 by Harlow Bundy, a founder of the Bundy Manufacturing Company, a leading producer of mechanical time clocks, which was the precursor of IBM.

Chemung County

Riverside Cemetery, Lowman – one of the earliest surviving cemeteries in Chemung County, it is the final resting place of many of the area’s earliest settlers, including several veterans of the American Revolution and the War of 1812, most of whose homes and farms have vanished.

Clinton County
Heyworth-Mason Industrial Building, Peru – the 1836 structure is an example of an early stone industrial building that housed A. Mason and Sons Lumber Company, a firm that operated for 90 years and greatly impacted the building industry in Clinton and Essex Counties.

Cortland County

William J. Greenman House, Cortland – the 1896 Queen Anne-style house is based on a design of George Franklin Barber, an early and successful proponent of &#8220house by mail&#8221 plans, for local manufacturer William Greenman.

Delaware County

Schoolhouse No. 5, Hamden – a mid-19th century rural one-room schoolhouse built in the winter of 1857-1858, sometimes known as Upper Dunk Hill School, which includes a schoolyard defined by a stone wall and mature trees planted by students to mark Arbor Day.

Erie County

Buffalo Seminary, Buffalo – an excellent example of the Collegiate Gothic-style, the 1909 building houses a significant educational institution which has served the Buffalo community for over 150 years and has produced numerous graduates who have made significant contributions to Buffalo and the nation.

University Park Historic District, Buffalo – a remarkably intact example of an early-20th century planned residential subdivision, reflecting the importance of the streetcar and the rise of automobile use in determining the city’s expansion.

Twentieth Century Club, Buffalo – built in 1896, the elegant Classical Revival clubhouse reflects the growth of the national women’s club movement and the increased influence of women generally in American life.

Engine House #2 and Hook & Ladder #9, Buffalo – originally constructed in 1875 to serve the needs of the rapidly growing city and its Allentown neighborhood, the Second Empire-style firehouse was expanded in 1896 to provide additional space for the Hook & Ladder #9.

Essex County

Crandall Marine Railway, Ticonderoga – the rare and remarkably intact 1927 railway dry dock facility was, and still is, used by the Lake George Steamboat Company to haul its excursion boats in and out of Lake George for maintenance and storage.

Fulton County

Hotel Broadalbin, Broadalbin – originally built in 1854 as a specialty store selling gloves manufactured at the local Northrup & Richards glove factory, it was greatly enlarged in 1881 for use as a hotel for the growing numbers of tourists visiting the Adirondacks.

Greene County

Oak Hill Cemetery, Oak Hill – the small, 5.6-acre cemetery originated as the burial place of early settlers Lucas and Deborah DeWitt on their family farm in the early 1820s, and evolved quickly into a community cemetery for residents of the hamlet.

Herkimer County

Frankfort Hill District #10 School, Frankfort Hill – constructed in 1846, the vernacular building retains a high degree of architectural integrity and remarkably served as an active public school for 110 years until 1956.

Kings County

Wallabout Historic District, Brooklyn – primarily residential buildings built between 1830 and 1930 – and especially rich in pre-Civil War wood houses – the district developed as Brooklyn’s residential development moved eastward and laborers came to work at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Lewis County

Stoddard-O’Connor House, Lowville – built in 1898, the Queen Anne/Colonial Revival-inspired home is adjacent to the commercial heart of Lowville, which was experiencing ample growth during the turn of the last century.

Mary Lyon Fisher Memorial Chapel, Lyonsdale – the late Gothic Revival masonry chapel in Wildwood Cemetery was built in 1921 by the children of Mary Lyon Fisher in honor of their mother, and is an important reminder of the philanthropy of the Lyon family, a preeminent family of the region.

Livingston County

Caledonia Fish Hatchery, Caledonia – the property is nationally historically significant for its association with Seth Green, who established the first fish hatchery in the western hemisphere in 1864, creating what has been acclaimed nationally and internationally as the world’s largest and most productive fish plant in continuous use.

Monroe County
Brockport Central Rural High School, Brockport – completed in 1934, today’s A.D. Oliver School is notable for its distinctive English Tudor Revival design, as well as its interior details, especially the auditorium’s stained-glass windows, which illustrate American historic figures.

Oatka Cemetery, Oak Hill – a late 19th century rural cemetery, which was attached to and merged with an earlie
r burying ground, known as Scottsville Cemetery, and contains markers of the area’s citizens from the early 19th century to the present.

Montgomery County

Van Wie Farmstead, (Valley View Farm) McKinley – the 1873 farmhouse based on Italianate-inspired pattern book architecture and associated farm buildings and acreage tell the story of changes in Mohawk Valley agricultural production, from the earliest 18th century wheat farmers to mechanized dairy production in the mid-20th century.

Nassau County
The Stephen Harding House and Studio, Sea Cliff – built in 1878 by photographer Stephen Harding as one of the original homes during the period when Methodist Camp Meetings were held in Sea Cliff.

Niagara County

Hazard H. Sheldon House, Niagara Falls – the 1857 ‘Italian Villa’ was the home Hazard H. Sheldon, a lawyer who played an important role in the civic affairs of the then-burgeoning Village of Niagara Falls.

Allan Herchell Carousel Factory, North Tonawanda – the existing State and National Register listing is expanded to include 39 Geneva Street, which served as the main office for the Allan Herschell Company from 1915 until 1945, when owner John Wendler developed the Kiddieland amusement park concept

Onondaga County
Huntley Apartments, Syracuse – constructed in 1928, and originally known as the Asaranaba, it reflects a trend in the city that saw the acceptance of apartment living on the part of the middle class in a city previously dominated by the single-family or two-family house.

Otsego County

Gilbertsville Water Works, Gilbertsville – in response to a series of large fires, the village of Gilbertsville was incorporated in 1896 with the specific purpose of establishing the water supply system, which it enlarged in 1914-18, and continues in use today.

The Tepee, Cherry Valley – an example of popular roadside architecture, the Tepee was built in 1954 by Ken and Iris Gurney, natives of Nebraska, where tepees were especially popular, who moved to upstate New York and decided to take advantage of growing automobile traffic along Route 20 to open a souvenir stand.

Rensselaer County

Dickinson Hill Fire Tower, Grafton – erected in 1924 by the New York State Conservation Commission in what is now Grafton Lakes State Park, it was one of more than 100 built after 1908 to identify fires and put them out before causing extensive loss of forest, open land, buildings, and wildlife.

Rockland County

Rockland Road Bridge Historic District, Piermont – the district includes a masonry arch bridge erected in 1874 to span the Sparkill Creek along with several nearby properties portraying various periods in the hamlet’s development.

Gurnee-Sherwood House, Wesley Hills – built in the 1790s and subsequently enlarged around 1830 during its ownership by Reverend James Sherwood, a Methodist clergyman who played a central role in the development of the area.Christ Church, Sparkill – built in 1864, the church remains a largely intact and noteworthy example of Gothic Revival-style religious design.

St. Lawrence County

Young Memorial Church, Brier Hill – built 1907-1908, the church is an intact example of the Shingle style, featuring a two-story square Gothic bell tower and decorative windows of opaque glass and stained glass medallions and portraits made by a local artisan.

Saratoga County

Smith’s Grain and Feed Store, Elnora – constructed in 1892, the store served the local farm community for generations by selling feed, grain, coal, fertilizers and other goods that were transported to the store by the railroad, which unloaded at the store’s own siding.

Steuben County

Cottages at Central Point, Hammondsport – built in the 1880s, the four cottages are a remarkably intact collection of picturesque seasonal vacation houses in the Finger Lakes, reflecting the beginnings of the residential development patterns that have come to dominate the region.

Sullivan County

Forestburgh Town Hall, Forestburgh – unaltered since its construction in 1927, the structure’s specifications exactly match the original town hall that burned to the ground the year before.

Warren County

Fort George, Lake George – archaeological investigations at the French and Indian War site have provided rare insights into New York’s colonial wars and it reflects early and successful public initiatives in land conservation and commemoration.

Wyoming County

Perry Downtown Historic District, Perry – the village district of commercial, civic and mixed use buildings reflects the growth and development of Perry as a regional commercial hub and the center of a booming textile industry from roughly 1830 to 1930.

35 Places Recommended to State, National Registers

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended that 35 properties and historic districts be added to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including Manhattan’s iconic Park Avenue and the nationally significant Crotona Play Center in the Bronx and the Hotel Lafayette in Buffalo.

The State and National Registers are the official lists of buildings, structures, districts, landscapes, objects and sites significant in the history, architecture, archeology and culture of New York State and the nation. There are approximately 90,000 historic buildings, structures and sites throughout the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places, individually or as components of historic districts. Property owners, municipalities and organizations from communities throughout the state sponsored the nominations.

Once the recommendations are approved by the state historic preservation officer, the properties are listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places and then nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, where they are reviewed and, once approved, entered on the National Register.

State and National Historic Register listing can assist property owners in revitalizing the structures, making them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and state and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits. Listing will oblige state and federal government agencies whose projects would adversely impact the properties to consider other options. Private projects are not subject to state or federal review after a property is listed, and private property owners – or in historic districts, a majority of property owners – must consent for the listing to move forward.

STATE REVIEW BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS

Allegany County

Ceres School, Ceres – the 1893 one-story frame structure is a surviving example of a late 19th century schoolhouse which served students from both Pennsylvania and New York.

Bronx County

Crotona Play Center, Bronx – the Art Moderne complex was one of eleven immense outdoor swimming pools opened in 1936 by then Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and Parks Commissioner Robert Moses, built through the Depression-era Works Progress Administration.

Cattaraugus County

School House #10/Ivers J. Norton Elementary, Olean – the 1909 school is a rare example of an early 20th century public school constructed with architectural references to the Prairie School style of architecture.

Chemung County

John Brand, Sr. House, Elmira – the intact 1871 large-scale Italianate home is a reflection of the prosperity and prominence of its owner, John Brand, Sr., a late 19th century brick manufacturer, grocer and tobacco farmer.

Chenango County

Rockwell Mills Historic District, Rockwell Mills – laid out along the Unadilla River is an intact example of a 19th century water-powered manufacturing hamlet.

Columbia County

Van Salsbergen Home, Hudson – built as a two-room limestone house around 1700 and expanded around 1860, the noteworthy home was built by early European settlers of the Hudson Valley.

North Hillsdale Methodist Church, North Hillsdale – built between 1837 and 1838, with the portico and steeple added in 1859, the Greek Revival church is a significant example of 19th century rural meetinghouse architecture.

Delaware County

Erskine L. Seeley House, Stamford – the distinctive Queen Anne style house was built in 1900 for Erskine Seeley, a well know leather manufacturer, merchant and prominent citizen of Stamford.

Dutchess County

Second Baptist Church of Dover, Dover Plains – built around 1833, the oldest religious building in the hamlet is an outstanding example early 19th center Protestant meetinghouse design.

Erie County

Hotel Lafayette, Buffalo – the 1902 French Renaissance style hotel is the most important building still standing designed by Louise Bethune, a Buffalo architect who was the first woman in the United States to be recognized as a professional architect by the American Institute of Architects and the Western Association of Architects.

Greene County

Torry-Chittenden Farmhouse, Durham – erected by Revolutionary War veteran William Torrey around 1799, it is distinct intact example of the type of late 18th century farmhouse built by settlers of New England origins.

Moore-Howland Estate, Catskill – built in 1866 by painter Charles Herbert Moore, the cottage with fine views of the Hudson River and Catskills was expanded in 1900 by the members of the wealthy Howland family.

Herkimer County

Thendara Historic District, Webb – a collection of five surviving late 19th and early 20th century associated with development around the Adirondack Division of the New York Central and Hudson Railroad that brought thousands of tourists to the region.

Monroe County

Edward Harrison House, Brockport – today the Brockport Alumni House, the French Second Empire home was built in 1877 by successful Brockport merchant tailor and civic leader Edward Harrison.

East Side Presbyterian Church, Rochester – today the Parsells Avenue Community Church, the simple Romanesque Revival church reflects the growth of the Beechwood section of Rochester in the early 20th century, where the church was built in two stages in 1909 and 1926.

Montgomery County

Caspar Getman Farmstead, Stone Arabia – a significant and highly intact example of family farm buildings from the late 18th to mid 19th century, operated by descendents of the Palatine Germans who settled the region.

Margaret Reaney Memorial Library, St. Johnsville – the 1909 Beaux Arts library and museum donated to the village by local textile manufacturer Joseph Reaney is an excellent example of civic architecture.

New York County

Park Avenue Historic District, New York – the linear corridor from 79th to 96th Street is a repository of some of the finest 1910s and 1920s apartment buildings in New York City, mostly built after a landscaped center mall was erected over an open railroad tunnel, making the avenue more desirable for residential development.

133 East 80th Street, New York – a distinct 1929-30 luxury apartment house designed in the French Gothic and Tudor Revival styles by not architect Rosario Candela, where several citizens nationally prominent in the arts, law, business and government have lived.

Niagara County

The Chilton Avenue-Orchard Parkway Historic District, Niagara Falls – the district includes a rare collection of contiguous, largely intact residential building from the late 1800s and early 1900s that reflect the appearance and character of the city in its heyday.

Park Place Historic District, Niagara Falls – the residential district features intact examples of American residential styles, spanning from late Italianate and Victorian-era Queen Anne to early 20th century craftsman and revival styles.

Morse Cobblestone Farmhouse, Wilson – constructed around 1840, the farmhouse is an excellent example of cobblestone masonry construction in New York.

Oneida County

Munson Williams Proctor Institute, Utica – the 1960 museum and arts center is a significant example of modern architecture designed by internationally-renowned architect Philip Johnson.

Onondaga County

Shepard Settlement Cemetery, Skaneateles – the rural cemetery founded in 1823 contains the graves of at least 30 armed forces veterans of all wars from the Revolutionary War to World War II.

Otsego County

Tunnicliff-Jordan House, Richfield Springs – one of the village’s earliest buildings, it was built between 1810 and 1825 by the sons of an early s
ettler, John Tunnicliff, who operated a saw and grist-mill industry at the site.

Rensselaer County

Chapel and Cultural Center, Troy – the 1968 example of Modernist quasi-religious architecture has been an important venue for the performing and visual arts in Troy.

Rockland County

Houser-Conklin House, Viola – the oldest sandstone portion of the 1775 house was built for Henry Houser, a veteran of the American Revolution.

William Ferndon House, Piermont – the high-style Neoclassical, also known as Ferndon Hall, was built in 1835 for William Ferndon, a successful Piermont woolen mill owner.

Schoharie County

Abraham Sternberg House, Schoharie – a distinctive and intact example of pre- and post-Revolutionary War Dutch and English building practices, built sometime in the late 18th century on land owned by the Sternberg family since the 1740s.

Steuben County

Gold Seal Winery, Hammondsport – originally the Urbana Wine Company, the 1865 Keuka Lake complex was the second winery established in the Finger Lakes region of New York.

Suffolk County

Frank W. Smith House, Amityville – the 1901 Queen Anne was built by prominent store owner Frank Smith during a period of rapid growth in the village due to the arrival of the railroad.

Saint Anne’s Episcopal Church, Sayville – the distinctive 1887-88 English Romanesque/Norman Revival church and its 1879 rectory were designed by noted Long Island architect Isaac H. Green, Jr.

Tompkins County

Telluride House, Ithaca – the 1909 example of early 20th century American architecture at Cornell University was built by Lucien Nunn, who made his fortune mining in Telluride, Colorado, and founded the Telluride Association to encourage pursuit of technical careers, particularly engineering.

Ulster/Delaware Counties

Amelita Galli-Curci Estate, Fleischmanns – the 1922 Catskill mountain estate named Sul Monte was designed by renowned country house architect Harrie T. Lindeberg for acclaimed Italian-American opera soprano Amelita Galli-Curci.

Westchester County

Witthoefft Residence, Armonk – the 1957 articulated steel structure is a rare example of modernist architectural design in the New York City suburbs, designed by architect Arthur Witthoefft.

28 Properties Recommended for Historic Register

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 28 properties to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including such nationally significant sites as the National Grid Building in downtown Syracuse, the Bird Homestead in Westchester County, and a French and Indian War archaeological site in Saratoga County.

State and National Historic Register listing can assist property owners in revitalizing the structures, making them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and state and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits. The State and National Registers are the official lists of buildings, structures, districts, landscapes, objects and sites significant in the history, architecture, archeology and culture of New York State and the nation. There are 90,000 historic buildings, structures and sites throughout the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places, individually or as components of historic districts. Property owners, municipalities and organizations from communities throughout the state sponsored the nominations.

Once the recommendations are approved by the state historic preservation officer, the properties are listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places and then nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, where they are reviewed and, once approved, entered on the National Register.

STATE REVIEW BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS

Broome County

Vestal Central School, Vestal – a distinctive 1939 Art Deco school built as part of the town’s centralization program to accommodate a fast-growing population and designed by one of the region’s prestigious architectural firms.

Chemung County

John Brand Jr. House (Parkside Apartments), Elmira – a distinguished and largely intact example of a large-scale Queen Anne/Shingle style residence built around 1890.

William S. Gerity House, Elmira – a large-scale Queen Anne/Eastlake style residence built around 1880 that is likely the work of Thomas Gerity, William’s father and a prominent contractor responsible for many of Elmira’s major buildings.

Erie County

Alling & Corey Warehouse, Buffalo – the 1910 building is an excellent and early Buffalo example of the type of reinforced concrete industrial buildings that came to be known as the &#8220Daylight Factory.&#8221

Buffalo Trunk Manufacturing Building, Buffalo &#8212- a 1901 &#8220slow-burn&#8221 masonry and wood factory that embodies the characteristics of a turn-of- the-twentieth-century industrial building constructed in manner to safeguard against the ravages of factory fires.

The Kamman Building, Building – the 1883 commercial building is a rare survivor of the Hydraulics/Larkin Neighborhood, one of Buffalo’s earliest, distinct neighborhoods, and Buffalo’s first manufacturing district, founded in the 1820s, which was an important self-contained neighborhood with a mix of industrial, commercial and residential architecture through the mid-20th century.

Essex County

Willsboro School, Willsboro – the 1927 Neoclassical style school building retains a high level of its original standardized school building design of the period.

Fulton County

Oppenheim and St. Johnsville Union Society Church, Crum Creek – a highly intact, representative example of vernacular religious architecture in rural Fulton County constructed in 1853.

Herkimer County

Overlook, Little Falls – the High Victorian house was built in 1889 for David H. Burrell, whose dairy industry inventions and innovations in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries helped make Little Falls one of the most important cheese-producing centers in the United States.

Kings County

The Jewish Center of Kings Highway, Midwood – built in 1928-30, the Neo-Classical synagogue dates from a period when Brooklyn had emerged as one of the world’s major Jewish population centers and combines religious facilities with classrooms, a social hall, and a gymnasium, as was characteristic of the &#8220Jewish Center&#8221 movement.

Kingsway Jewish Center, Midwood – built in 1951, it is an example of a post-World War II modern synagogue in Brooklyn.

Young Israel of Flatbush – built in 1925-29 for an Orthodox Jewish congregation, the Moorish Revival synagogue reflects an international trend to adapt the more ‘Eastern’ Moorish-style to synagogue design.

Monroe County

First Baptist Church of Mumford – a largely intact representative example of vernacular Greek Revival style church architecture built in 1852 for a rural Protestant congregation.

Teoronto Block Historic District, Rochester – the well-preserved examples of mid-19th century commercial architecture reflect the city’s rapid growth as a mill center and Erie Canal boomtown.

Onondaga County

The Niagara Hudson Building (National Grid Building), Syracuse – completed in 1932, the headquarters for then the nation’s largest electric utility company is an outstanding example of Art Deco architecture and a symbol of the Age of Electricity.

Onondaga Highlands-Swaneola Heights Historic District, Syracuse – a turn-of-the-twentieth-century subdivision where the rolling topography, uniform building setback, and popular residential styles form a cohesive neighborhood that retains its architectural integrity.

Orange County

Newburgh Colored Burial Ground, Newburgh – an archeological site with great potential to yield information about the city’s mid-19th century African-American population.

Walsh-Havemeyer House, New Windsor – the Greek Revival influenced house was built around 1835 for a family who operated one of the region’s early industries on the adjacent Quassaic Creek.

Lower Dock Hill Road Stone Arch Bridge, Cornwall-on-Hudson – an early example of 19th century stone arch bridge construction.

St. Lawrence County

First Congregational Church of Madrid – the 1890 Eastlake-style church building has been the spiritual and social center for the oldest congregational church society in St. Lawrence County.

Sunday Rock, Colton – public outcry has twice saved the 64,000 pound glacial boulder, a natural traveler’s landmark for centuries, from demolition to make way for construction of State Highway 56.

Saratoga County

The Royal Blockhouse – built in 1758 in the vicinity of Fort Edward, the Royal Blockhouse was a key part of one of the largest British military complexes in North America at the beginning of the French and Indian War, and its remnants are likely to yield a wealth of archaeological information about 18th century military practices.

Schenectady County

Ronsendale Common School, Niskayuna – the rural school building, which served students from its construction in the 1850s until 1915, retains an exceptionally high degree of architectural integrity in a rural setting despite rapid commercial and residential development in the town.

Steuben County

Atlanta Presbyterian Church, Atlanta – a well-preserved example of Queen Anne-style church architecture which reflects Atlanta’s late-nineteenth century prosperity as an important local transportation, food processing and commercial center.

Ulster County

Lattingtown Baptist Church, Marlborough – Constructed circa 1810, in what was the original center of activity for the town of Marlborough, the Federal period meeting house style church is closely associated with the settlement, growth and development of this riverside town.

Warren County

Methodist Episcopal Church, Stony Creek – Built in 1856-59, the building is a good e
xample of wood frame church architecture in a small Adirondack cross-roads settlement.

Westchester County

The Bird Homestead, Rye – the 1835 Greek Revival was the home of Henry Bird and sons Roland T. Bird and Junius Bird, three prominent scientists who made discoveries of national significance in the fields of entomology, paleontology, and archeology respectively, and were leading members of the American Museum of Natural History.

Tuckahoe High School, Tuckahoe – the 1930-31 school is an outstanding example of Art Deco public architecture, reflecting the importance of education to its suburban community.

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32 Places Offered for NY State, National Registers

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 32 properties to the State and National Registers of Historic Places. Property owners, municipalities and organizations from communities throughout the state sponsored the nominations.

&#8220From urban office towers and factories to rural cemeteries and hillside retreats, these nominations reflect New York’s distinctive history,&#8221 said Carol Ash, Commissioner of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. &#8220Recognizing these landmarks will help us to preserve, appreciate and understand New York’s unique past.&#8221

Listing these properties on the State and National Registers can assist their owners in revitalizing the structures. Listing will make them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits.

The State and National Registers are the official lists of buildings, structures, districts, landscapes, objects and sites significant in the history, architecture, archeology and culture of New York State and the nation. There are nearly 90,000 historic buildings, structures and sites throughout the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places, individually or as components of historic districts.

Once the recommendations are approved by the state historic preservation officer, the properties are listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places and then nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, where they are reviewed and, once approved, entered on the National Register.

STATE REVIEW BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS

Albany County

1. Peltier House, Cohoes

2. Norman’s Vale (Nott House), Guilderland

3. New Scotland Presbyterian Church & Cemetery, Slingerlands

Cayuga County

4. Hutchinson Homestead, Cayuga

Chautauqua County

5. Dunkirk Schooner Site, Dunkirk

Chenango County

6. Holden B. Mathewson House, South Otselic

7. Eaton Family Residence/Jewish Center of Norwich, Norwich

Columbia County

8. Conyn-Van Rensselaer House, Claverack

9. St. John’s Lutheran Church, Ancram

10. Pratt Homestead, Spencertown

Cortland County

11. Stage Coach Inn/Royal Johnson House

Erie County

12. E.&B. Holmes Machinery Company Building, Buffalo

Herkimer County

13. Masonic Temple, Newport Lodge No.455, Newport

Kings County

14. Beth-El Jewish Center of Flatbush, Brooklyn

Livingston County

15. Sweet Briar, Geneseo

Madison County

16. Chittenango Pottery, Chittenango

Monroe County

17. Lake View Cemetery, Brockport

Montgomery County

18. Chalmers Knitting Mill, Amsterdam

New York County

19. New York Telephone Co. Building, Manhattan

20. Park and Tilford Building, Manhattan

Niagara County

21. 8 Berkley Drive, Lockport

Oneida County

22. First United Methodist Church, Rome

23. Edward W. Stanley Recreation Center, Clinton

Onondaga County

24. Louis Will House, Syracuse

25. C.G. Meaker Warehouse and Syracuse Industrial Properties, Syracuse

Orange County

26. Dock Hill Extension Stone Arch Bridge, Cornwall-on-Hudson

27. Balmville Cemetery, Balmville

Oswego County

28. Dr. Charles M. Lee House, Fulton

29. Little Stone House, Mexico

Richmond County

30. Jacques Marchais Center of Tibetan Art, Staten Island

Suffolk County

31. William Cauldwell House, Noyac

Westchester County

32. Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow

39 Nominated for NY State-National Historic Register

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation has recommended the addition of 39 properties to the State and National Registers of Historic Places. Property owners, municipalities and organizations from communities throughout the state sponsored the nominations.

Well-known landmarks and districts recommended for listing, including:

Garment Center Historic District – which includes 215 structures in a 25-block section of Midtown Manhattan, an area shaped by the city’s economic history, immigrant history, zoning and planning developments, and reforms following the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.

Woodlawn Cemetery – a vast 400-acre cemetery in the Bronx, where many of New York City’s arts, business and civic leaders are buried, including jazz trumpeter Miles Davis, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, author Herman Melville, newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer, women’s rights movement leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and department store magnate Frank Woolworth. The cemetery is composed of an unprecedented collection of artistically important memorials set in the Landscape-Lawn style.

The Niagara Hotel – A product of Niagara Falls’ history of tourism, industry and commerce, the 1925 structure is the last and only surviving major hotel of those that once dominated the city’s downtown.


Washington Square Historic District
– Oswego’s historic civic and religious center that developed around a village green established in 1797.

Lustron Houses of Jermain Street Historic District – a remarkably intact Albany district of mid-20th century prefabricated steel homes manufactured by the Lustron Corporation to respond to the post-World War II housing demand.

New York Central Passenger and Freight Station – an outstanding example of an Art Deco train station built in 1936 – a style representative of the last gasp of major railroad station construction in the United States – in Syracuse, a major transportation hub in New York State.

Listing these properties on the state and national registers can assist their owners in revitalizing the structures. Listing will make them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits.

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation is an independent panel of experts appointed by the governor. The Board also consists of representatives from the following state organizations: Council of Parks- Council on the Arts- Department of Education- Department of State and Department of Environmental Conservation. The function of the Board is to advise and provide recommendations on state and federal preservation programs, including the State and National Registers of Historic Places, to the State Historic Preservation Officer, who in New York is the State Parks Commissioner.

The State and National Registers are the official lists of buildings, structures, districts, landscapes, objects and sites significant in the history, architecture, archeology and culture of New York State and the nation. There are nearly 90,000 historic buildings, structures and sites throughout the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places, individually or as components of historic districts.

During the nomination process, the State Board submits recommendations to the State Historic Preservation Officer. The properties may be listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places and then nominated to the National Register of Historic Places where they are reviewed and, once approved, entered on the National Register by the Keeper of the National Register in Washington, D.C.

The recommended properties listed by county are as follows:

STATE REVIEW BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS

Albany County

1. Lustron Houses at Jermain Street Historic District – Albany

Allegany County

2. Centerville Town Hall – Centerville

Erie County

3. Lancaster District School No. 6 – Lancaster

4. Annunciation School – Buffalo

5. Buffalo Tennis and Squash Club – Buffalo

6. Harlow C. Curtis Building – Buffalo

7. Sardinia Old Town Hall – Sardinia

8. The Baptist Church of Springville – Springville

9. Richmond Avenue Methodist-Episcopal Church – Buffalo

Franklin County

10. James Wilder Farmstead – Burke

Greene County

11. Methodist-Episcopal Church of Windham Centre – Windham

12. Woodward Road Stone Arch Bridge – East Durham

13. Tannersville Main Street Historic District – Tannersville

Herkimer County

14. Emmanuel Episcopal Church – Little Falls

Jefferson County

15. Hiram Hubbard House – Champion

Lewis County

16. Lowville G.A.R. Soldier’s Monument – Lowville

Livingston County

17. Engleside – Dansville

Montgomery County

18. Kilts Farmstead – Palatine Bridge

New York City

19. Garment Center Historic District – Manhattan

20. General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen – Manhattan

21. New York Congregational Home for the Aged – Brooklyn

22. The Woodlawn Cemetery – Bronx

23. Tremont Baptist Church – Bronx

Niagara County

24. The Niagara – Niagara Falls

Oneida County

25. Sylvan Beach Union Chapel – Sylvan Beach

Onondaga County

26. New York Central Passenger and Freight Station – Syracuse

Orange County

27. St. Andrew’s Cemetery – Walden

28. Milliken-Smith Farm – Montgomery

Orleans County

29. Benjamin Franklin Gates House – Albion

30. John Shelp Cobblestone House – Middleport

Oswego County

31. Historic and architectural resources in Oswego, including the Washington Square Historic District – Oswego

32. Oswego Yacht Club – Oswego

Rockland County

33. Johannes Isaac Blauvelt House – Blauvelt

34. Contempora House – New City

Ulster County

35. Saugerties Public Library – Saugerties

Warren County

36. Forward wreck site – Lake George

Washington County

37. Stoops Hotel – Battenville

Westchester County

38. Presbyterian Rest for Convalescents – White Plains

39. Soundview Manor – White Plains