Tag Archives: Iroquois Indian Museum

Iroquois Stories for Thanksgiving Season

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY will present “Iroquois Stories for the Season of Thanksgiving” with writer and storyteller Susan Fantl Spivack on Sunday, October 24th at 2 p.m. Museum visitors will enjoy traditional Iroquois stories such as “The Brave Woman and the Flying Head” and “The Talking Stone.”

Ms. Spivack teaches poetry writing workshops to children and adults, and since 1991, has brought her program, &#8220Tricks of the Trade: Stories to Take Home, to libraries and scouting groups. Ms. Spivack conducted The Community Library Story Hour in Cobleskill, NY for thirty years, and has told Iroquois myths and tales at the Iroquois Indian Museum of Schoharie County where she has served as an adjunct educator.

For more information visit the Iroquois Indian Museum online at www.iroquoismuseum.org, e-mail info@iroquoismuseum.org, or call 518-296-8949.

29th Annual Iroquois Indian Festival

The Iroquois Indian Museum of Howes Cave, New York, has announced the 29th Annual Iroquois Indian Festival will be held on Labor Day weekend, Saturday, September 4 through Sunday, September 5. The two-day festival’s goal is to foster a greater appreciation and deeper understanding of Iroquois culture through presentations of Iroquois music and social dance, traditional stories, artwork, games and food. This year’s master of ceremonies will be Museum Educator, Mike “Rohrha:re” Tarbell, a member of the Turtle Clan from the Ahkwesahsne Mohawk Nation.

The annual festival centers on the celebration of Iroquois creativity and self-expression by featuring an all Iroquois Indian Art Market open to Iroquois artists by special invitation only. Both traditional and contemporary arts are showcased.

The Sky Dancers from Six Nations Reserve in Ontario will perform traditional Iroquois social dances, and may invite the public out onto the dance floor to participate, as well. The Children’s Tent will feature arts & crafts activities including beadwork and cornhusk doll making. Local wildlife rehabilitator Kelly Martin will be available to discuss wildlife conservation in our bioregion and will present a variety of wild animals including birds of prey. Pamela Brown “Wolf Teacher” returns to promote understanding and awareness of wolves and the importance of their survival with a display of educational and informational materials and fundraising items. The Museum’s archeology department will be available to help identify archeological finds.

NEW THIS YEAR: Mohawk educator Amanda Tarbell will give a presentation of Iroquois stories each day. Wilderness survival teacher and mentor, Barry Keegan will share his expertise with a daily presentation on flinknapping and other early survival skills.

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND: Nature Walk with Mike Tarbell in the Museum’s 45 acre Nature Park.

Food is an important part of any culture, and a full array of Native foods will be available for purchase provided by Frank and Pam Ramsey from Onondaga. Delicious traditional entrees include buffalo burgers, Indian tacos, venison sausage, roasted corn soup and frybread.

The Festival will be held at the Iroquois Indian Museum on Saturday and Sunday from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM each day, rain or shine. Performances will take place in the Museum’s outdoor covered amphitheater and the artists participating in the art-market will be set up in adjacent tents. Visit the Museum’s web site at www.iroquoismuseum.org for a performance schedule.

The Festival is supported in part through grants from The New York State Council on the Arts, and donations from members and friends of the Museum.

The Iroquois Indian Museum is located just 35 miles west of Albany New York, near the intersection of highways 7 and 145. Take exit 22 from Interstate 88 and follow the signs. There is a fee for entrance to the Festival grounds. For more information call the Museum at (518) 296-8949, or go to the Museum’s website at www.iroquoismuseum.org.

Photo: Iroquois Sky Dancer at the 2007 Iroquois Indian Festival.

Haudenosaunee Dancers at Iroquois Museum

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY has announced the second in a series of three “Summer Dance Saturdays” featuring Iroquois social dance groups. This Saturday, July 31, will feature the Haudenosaunee Dancers from Onondaga. The group will perform three sets at approximately 11, 1, and 3. Visitors are encouraged and welcomed to join in with the dancers.

Led by Sherri Waterman Hopper, the Haudenosaunee Dancers will perform Iroquois social dances as practiced in their small traditional community near Syracuse. Waterman-Hopper has traveled internationally as an artist and cultural speaker.

The Dancers feature a core group of seasoned singer/musicians and young adults. Pride in the culture and adherence to the traditions are the hallmarks of this troupe. Hopper is also a respected designer and seamstress who incorporates her knowledge of the construction and significance of traditional outfits into her presentations.

For more information contact the Museum at: Iroquois Indian Museum, P.O. Box 7, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave, NY 12092, 518-296-8949, info@iroquoismuseum.org or visit their web site at www.iroquoismuseum.org.

Iroquois Indian Museum Offers Early Technology Day

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY kicks off a celebration of our 30th Anniversary on Saturday, April 10 with the 1st Annual Early Technology Day, their annual Spring Party and a special screening of a new documentary on the museum’s history.

Early Technology Day highlights include: demonstrations of the process of flint knapping, fire making, atl-atl spear throwing, early archery and show-and-tell, and displays and demonstrations from the nearby Old Stone Fort Museum Complex. Flint knapping is the ancient art of making chipped stone tools. Activities take place on the Museum grounds from 10 to 3.

At 4 p.m. there will be a premier of “A Museum Is Born” a 40 minute documentary produced, videotaped, and edited by Dennis Shaw, Shaw Video Productions, of Richmondville. The DVD tells the museum’s history through interviews with the founding Director and current Trustee &#8211 Christina Johannsen Hanks, Curator &#8211 Stephanie Shultes, Native American Educator &#8211 Mike Tarbell, and Director &#8211 Erynne Ansel-McCabe. Native American artworks featured at the museum, old photographs, and past exhibits are also featured. The Documentary was made possible in part with public funds from the Decentralization Program of the New York State Council on the Arts, administered through the Tri-County Arts Council.

The celebration of Native American performers continues with an opening reception from 3 to 6 p.m. for the 2010 exhibition “Native Americans in the Performing Arts: From Broadway to Hollywood”. Countless Native actors have contributed to the success of stage and screen productions for well over a century. The 2010 exhibit presents the histories of the early Wild West performers, the Silent Movie Stars, the talented character actors, and today’s hot new prospects. Highlighted actors include, Jay Silverheels of “Tonto and the Lone Ranger” fame- Cherokee humorist Will Rogers- Alex Meraz who plays Paul in “New Moon” and “Eclipse”, and Elaine Miles who portrayed Marilyn on the popular television show “Northern Exposure”. The exhibition runs from April 1 to December 31.

For more information contact the Museum at: Iroquois Indian Museum, P.O. Box 7, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave, NY 12092, 518-296-8949, info@iroquoismuseum.org or visit their web site at www.iroquoismuseum.org

Iroquois Indian Museums Free Fall Party, Nov. 14

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY invites everyone to attend a FREE Fall Party on Saturday, November 14 from 3 to 6 P.M. This year’s annual Fall Party kicks off a celebration of the Museum’s 30th anniversary. Visitors can enjoy our current exhibit: &#8220Native Americans in the Performing Arts: From Ballet to Rock and Roll&#8221, view a special tribute display to the late Ray Fadden, play Clan Animal Bingo for prizes, and sample the tasty refreshments.

The Iroquois Indian Museum is a truly unique cultural destination, strategically located just minutes from Howe Caverns. The Museum’s mission is to educate the public about Iroquois art, culture, and history. The Iroquois are those Native American peoples belonging to one or more of the Six Nations: Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora. They are the original New Yorkers. The Museum houses one of the largest collections of contemporary Iroquois art in the world, alongside important historical and archaeological collections. The Museum features exhibits of both traditional and experimental Iroquois arts, an interactive hands-on Children’s Museum area, and offers a wide range of programs, tours, and special events, many of which can be geared to a group’s specific needs. The Museum building is a work of art in itself, designed in the shape and spirit of the old longhouses that once graced the valleys of upstate New York, but constructed as a fully modern building with a state of the art climate control system. The Museum is wheelchair-accessible, and can accommodate as many as 100 visitors at one time. The Museum also features a forty-five acre Nature Park with three hiking trails. Tours of the Museum and Nature Park can be planned for 1-4 hours, and advance reservations are usually necessary.

Iroquois Museum To Present Haudenosaunee Artists

On Sunday, October 4 at 2 P.M., the Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY will present a lecture by Dr. Robert Spiegleman entitled, “Spirits Return – Inspired Images by Haudenosaunee Artists.” Dr. Spiegleman’s talk centers around a 2008 exhibition that featured works by five Haudenosaunee painters &#8211 Peter Jemison, Carson Waterman, David Fadden, John Fadden and Tracey Shenandoah. The exhibition commemorated the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) historical, cultural, and environmental footprint in northeast Pennsylvania’s Susquehanna Valley. Some call the area &#8220The Southern Door,&#8221 a region, which contained and contains Haudenosaunee people and dependent and incorporated peoples from other tribes. It has a marginalized, rich history that needs to be re-integrated into an overall understanding of the Haudenosaunee legacy. Slides of the artist’s work from the exhibition will be shown and discussed at the lecture.

As a sociologist, multimedia artist and writer, Dr. Robert Spiegelman presents widely on New York, Iroquois, Irish and environmental themes. The founder of SullivanClinton.com and Derryveagh.com, Spiegelman revisits hidden histories that link past and present, and foster indigenous values of peace, democracy and nature-in-balance. A college teacher for 12 years, he holds a Doctorate in Sociology from CUNY Graduate Center.

For more information contact the Iroquois Indian Museum at: P.O. Box 7, 324 Caverns Rd. Howes Cave, NY 12092. E-mail info@iroquoismuseum.org, call 518-296-8949, or visit
www.iroquoismuseum.org

28th Annual Iroquois Indian Festival Sept. 5-6

The Iroquois Indian Museum of Howes Cave, New York, announces the 28th Annual Iroquois Indian Festival to be held on Labor Day weekend, Saturday, September 5 through Sunday, September 6. The two-day festival’s goal is to foster a greater appreciation and deeper understanding of Iroquois culture through presentations of Iroquois music and social dance, traditional stories, artwork, games and food. This year’s master of ceremonies will be Museum Educator, Mike Wahrare Tarbell, a member of the Turtle Clan from the Ahkwesahsne Mohawk Nation.

The annual festival centers on the celebration of Iroquois creativity and self-expression by featuring an all Iroquois Indian Art Market open to Iroquois artists by special invitation only. Both traditional and contemporary arts are showcased.

This year we celebrate the return of Santee Smith (Mohawk, Turtle Clan). Santee is from the Six Nations Reserve, where she has gained recognition as both a performing artist (dance) and as a visual artist (pottery). She will be presenting excerpts from her two major works, “Kaha:wi” and “A Story Before Time”. Santee will be performing with Emily Law and, for the first time, with her daughter, Semiah Smith. We are very pleased to be able to welcome Santee, Emily and Semiah to this year’s Festival.

The Sky Dancers from Six Nations Reserve in Ontario will perform traditional Iroquois social dances, and may invite the public out onto the dance floor to participate, as well. The Children’s Tent will feature arts & crafts activities including beadwork and cornhusk doll making. Local wildlife rehabilitator Kelly Martin will be available to discuss wildlife conservation in our bioregion and will present a variety of wild animals including birds of prey along with a special presentation in the Museum’s outdoor amphitheater. Pamela Brown “Wolf Teacher” returns to promote understanding and awareness of wolves and the importance of their survival with a display of educational and informational materials and fundraising items. Other special features include displays and demonstrations on genealogy, archeology, and flintknapping led by talented and knowledgeable Iroquois Museum volunteers.

Food is an important part of any culture, and a full array of Native foods will be available for purchase provided by Frank and Pam Ramsey from Onondaga. Delicious traditional entrees include buffalo burgers, Indian tacos, venison sausage, roasted corn soup and frybread.

The Festival will be held at the Iroquois Indian Museum on Saturday and Sunday from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM each day, rain or shine. Performances will take place in the Museum’s outdoor covered amphitheater and the artists participating in the art-market will be set up in adjacent tents.

The Iroquois Indian Museum is located just 35 miles west of Albany New York, near the intersection of highways 7 and 145. Take exit 22 from Interstate 88 and follow the signs. There is a fee for entrance to the Festival grounds. For more information call the Museum at (518) 296-8949, or go to the Museum’s website at www.iroquoismuseum.org.

International Dance Preformances and Workshops

The Iroquois Indian Museum is proud to present a weekend Dance Festival on July 11 and 12, 2009. This two-day event will feature international dancers as well as Iroquois Social Dance performers. On Saturday, July 11th the dance groups will include St.Adalbert’s Polish Dancers, St. Sophia’s Greek Dancers and the Irish dancers Iona Troupe. Each group will perform for approximately 45 minutes beginning at noon. The Iroquois Dancers, Alan Brant and Family, Mohawk from Tyendinaga, will also perform. The Brant Family are returning again by request and, as is the tradition, they will be teaching Iroquois Social Dance to all who wish to participate.

On Sunday the Iroquois Indian Museum will feature two award winning DVD’s: Maria Tallchief at 1:00pm and Jock Soto at 3:00. Both DVD’s compliment the Museum’s current exhibit “Native Americans in the Performing Arts: From Ballet to Rock & Roll. The Mohawk Dancers will perform throughout the day on Sunday as well.

Photo: Alan Brant, leader of the Mohawk Dancers from Tyendinaga.

New Exhibit On Native American Performing Arts Opens

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY has announced the opening of their 2009 exhibition: “Native Americans in the Performing Arts: From Ballet to Rock and Roll.” America’s first Prima Ballerina, Maria Tallchief- Grammy winning singer/songwriter, Joanne Shenandoah- founding member of the Village People, Felipe Rose- and legendary Rock musician, Robbie Robertson are a few of the Native American performers featured in this dynamic new exhibition.

According to the exhibit announcement: Native American performing artists are an integral part of the growth of popular music and dance in America. Many Native musicians and dancers rank with the most notable and recognizable of popular performers. In classical, country, opera, and rock music and in vaudeville, ballet and modern dance, Native American performing artists often have been the innovators and the inspiration to other performers. In addition to the numerous contemporary Native performers, the exhibition honors some of the groundbreaking artists who starred in the early Wild West Shows and traveled the world performing with orchestras, operas and vaudeville productions. We also explore the rich
history of traditional Iroquois song and dance.

The exhibition runs from April 1 to December 31. A free opening reception and party will be held on Saturday, April 4 from 3 to 6 pm. As part of the exhibition, the Museum will present “Saturday Matinees” on the first Saturday of every month, featuring films and documentaries on many of the featured performers. For more information contact the Museum at: Iroquois Indian Museum, P.O. Box 7, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave, NY 12092, 518-296-8949, info@iroquoismuseum.org or visit our web site at www.iroquoismuseum.org

Laurence M. Hauptman to Speak at Iroquois Museum

The Iroquois Indian Museum will present “More than Games: Iroquois Indians and Other Native American Athletes at Carlisle Indian School”, a lecture by Dr. Laurence M. Hauptman on Sunday, October 5th at 1PM. The Iroquois Indian Museum is located 35 miles west of Albany, New York, near the intersection of highways 7 and 145. Take exit 22 from Interstate 88 and follow signs. For information and detailed directions call the Museum at (518) 296-8949 or visit our website at www.iroquoismuseum.org.

For Native people, sports are an important part of traditional society. Athletic prowess, sportsmanship, competitiveness, and spirituality are intertwined with various sporting activities. “Ball” games were always extremely popular among Native Americans. Team sports such as lacrosse, Shinny Ball, Double Ball, and Long Ball emphasize the importance of strength of both the body and mind and of leadership and responsibility to others. Baseball became yet another venue for enhancing and demonstrating skill and dexterity.

Dr. Hauptman is a SUNY Distinguished Professor of History at SUNY New Paltz where he has taught for the past 35 years. He is the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of 14 books on the Iroquois and other Native Americans. Dr. Hauptman has served as an historical consultant for the Wisconsin Oneidas, the Cayugas, the Mashantucket Pequots, the Senecas, and the Seneca-Cayugas.